Individual Retirement Accounts We Offer

At FC360, our team of investment advisors understands the importance of long-term investing and planning. Whether you are looking to boost your retirement income, better manage your retirement portfolio, or build a financial legacy, our team is here to help you plan your strategy.

Traditional IRA

A Traditional IRA offers individuals a retirement account which can provide immediate tax benefits due to tax-deductible contributions. As of 2015, an individual can contribute $5,500 annually as tax-deferred income until he/she reaches the age of 70 1/2. Individuals who are age 50 or older can also contribute an additional $1,000 annually due to the catch-up provision. Married individuals may also establish a separate IRA for a non-income earning spouse and contribute up to $5,500 annually to their spouse’s account.

Traditional IRA distribution can begin without penalty starting at the age of 59 1/2. For account holders who are of age 70 1/2 on or before April 1st of their 71st birthday must take mandatory distributions each year called RMDs.

To open an FC360 IRA:

  • You must be under age 70½ by the end of the calendar year
  • You must have earned income or a spouse with qualified earned income

Roth IRA

Roth IRAs differ in many ways from a Traditional IRA. The first major difference is that Roth IRAs have income limit restrictions in order to participate. Secondly, though the annual contribution limits are the same, your annual contributions will be made with after-tax dollars and a tax deduction will not be available for the contribution year. However, contributions made and any earnings will be tax-free at distribution. Lastly, all contributed funds can be withdrawn at any time and there are now RMDs required with a Roth IRA.

Withdrawals

A Roth IRA account holder can withdraw their contributions tax-free at anytime, however, any withdrawal of earnings will only be tax free from federal income tax if the following conditions are met:

  • You are purchasing your first home ($10,000 lifetime maximum)
  • The Roth IRA has been in existence for at least five years
  • You are age 59½ or older
  • You become disabled or have passed away

Traditional IRA to Roth IRA Conversions

A Traditional IRA account holder can convert to a Roth IRA at anytime he/she would like. However, you might want to note that when one converts their account over to a Roth IRA, the account holder will be subject to income taxes on the converted amount. To minimize the tax implications, an account holder can convert their Traditional IRA over several years.

Rollover IRA

Individuals who hold outside 401(k) and 403(b) accounts may convert multiple accounts into one easy-to-monitor account. Opening a FC360 Rollover IRA will help make the consolidation process fast, easy, and hassle-free and will allow you the ability to better manage your retirement assets without any of the hidden retirement plan fees.

Rollover IRAs have the same annual contribution and  distributions rules as the Traditional IRA. However, if contributions are made into a Rollover IRA account the account owner might lose his/her ability to roll the assets into a new employer’s plan.

With no setup cost or hidden fees a FC360 Rollover IRA is the best way to better manage your retirement assets.

Need Assistance with Your IRA Rollover?

Call or email our Advisors at 916-379-7980.

Minor Traditional / Roth IRA

If you are looking for a way to help a minor start saving for retirement, then the Minor IRA is surely the way to go. Setting up a Traditional or Roth Minor IRA is just as simple as setting up a regular IRA account. However, the account must be in both the minor’s name as well as the custodian’s, and set up using the minor’s Tax ID number. Lastly, for a minor to set up an IRA he/she must have earned income and may not include any gifts or inheritances.

Contribution Limits:

  • Minors, parents, and grandparents may contribute to a Minor IRA.
  • Contribution limits are set based on the minor’s total earned income of the contribution year. The minor may contribute up to the IRS annual limit or all of the minor’s earned income, whichever is the lesser of the two.